RODEO ARCHITECTS

Crematorium, Sandefjord

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Crematorium, Sandefjord

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Type: Open Competition 2nd Prize
Client: Vestfold og Telemark fylkeskommuner
Program: Crematorium
Size: 1.500 m2
Location: Sandefjord, Norway
Status: Delivered 2008

Team: Ivar Lyngner, Henning Sunde, Anders Ese

Rodeo delivered a proposition for a new crematorium "Diamonds are Forever" for Vestfold and Telemark, which won 2. prize in an open architectural competition. There were 41 competitors.

The crematorium site i situated along highway E18 with an adjacent forest, indigenous to the region. Our proposal is situated as a barrier towards the highway, creating quiet, contemplative outdoor spaces in direct connection to the ceremonial parts of the building.

Today's access to the site is maintained in the proposal, ushering the visitor through the forested area before engaging with the building. The approach is predetermined by the building's programmatic functions. A driveway passes the ceremonial zone, then past the building's administration an visitor parking, to end up at the back of the building, where the maintenance programs are collected.

The competition brief suggests a symbolic building visible from the highway and the air. In light of the building's program this suggestion is in our opinion somewhat less fortunate. Creating great architecture does not necessarily imply the need for signal value in this case.

Employees at a crematorium often have a sombre job. A user friendly organization of programs and clear communication inside the building will help ease the necessary tasks connected to such work. All maintenance, coffin reception, deliveries, and work entrance are located along the northern "spine" of the structure. Administrative facilities are located to the east, at the end of the spine, in juncture with the visitor parking space. The ceremonial parts of the building face southwards, and communicate with the forest. We have opted for a single story plan. Except for a few necessary installations there are no elevators, shafts or motorised levers moving the coffin. It will at all points be handled by people, giving a necessary human touch to what can often become too pragmatic. The plan is solved so that there is a clear distinction between maintenance and visitor zones.

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Type: Open Competition 2nd Prize
Client: Vestfold og Telemark fylkeskommuner
Program: Crematorium
Size: 1.500 m2
Location: Sandefjord, Norway
Status: Delivered 2008

Team: Ivar Lyngner, Henning Sunde, Anders Ese

Rodeo delivered a proposition for a new crematorium "Diamonds are Forever" for Vestfold and Telemark, which won 2. prize in an open architectural competition. There were 41 competitors.

The crematorium site i situated along highway E18 with an adjacent forest, indigenous to the region. Our proposal is situated as a barrier towards the highway, creating quiet, contemplative outdoor spaces in direct connection to the ceremonial parts of the building.

Today's access to the site is maintained in the proposal, ushering the visitor through the forested area before engaging with the building. The approach is predetermined by the building's programmatic functions. A driveway passes the ceremonial zone, then past the building's administration an visitor parking, to end up at the back of the building, where the maintenance programs are collected.

The competition brief suggests a symbolic building visible from the highway and the air. In light of the building's program this suggestion is in our opinion somewhat less fortunate. Creating great architecture does not necessarily imply the need for signal value in this case.

Employees at a crematorium often have a sombre job. A user friendly organization of programs and clear communication inside the building will help ease the necessary tasks connected to such work. All maintenance, coffin reception, deliveries, and work entrance are located along the northern "spine" of the structure. Administrative facilities are located to the east, at the end of the spine, in juncture with the visitor parking space. The ceremonial parts of the building face southwards, and communicate with the forest. We have opted for a single story plan. Except for a few necessary installations there are no elevators, shafts or motorised levers moving the coffin. It will at all points be handled by people, giving a necessary human touch to what can often become too pragmatic. The plan is solved so that there is a clear distinction between maintenance and visitor zones.