RODEO ARCHITECTS

Low Occupancy Study

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Low Occupancy Study

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In March 2015 Rodeo were commissioned to investigate why clients were not moving in to housing built by WAT-HST, a cooperative housing NGO in Tanzania. By late 2014, WAT-HST and their partner institutions in the UK and Norway were becoming concerned, as few people had moved into their new homes, despite rather large construction schemes being initiated. In certain building sites, houses were falling apart from lack of inhabitation and maintenance. The problem was not universal though. In some places people were moving in, in other places not. Why was this? Together with a team of community mobilisers from WAT-HST, Rodeo carried out a series of qualitative interviews of “stayers” and “movers”. A working method was developed based on initial findings from interviews, and a series of discoveries were made that helped WAT-HST take action to alleviate the situation. In part, WAT-HST’s problem turned out to be lacking client profiling before offering people loans to construct houses. The problem can be summed up in the following practical equation: income * job situation * family/ size of family * flexibility of work situation = the ability to invest in their home to enable them to move in vs not able to invest in their home.

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In March 2015 Rodeo were commissioned to investigate why clients were not moving in to housing built by WAT-HST, a cooperative housing NGO in Tanzania. By late 2014, WAT-HST and their partner institutions in the UK and Norway were becoming concerned, as few people had moved into their new homes, despite rather large construction schemes being initiated. In certain building sites, houses were falling apart from lack of inhabitation and maintenance. The problem was not universal though. In some places people were moving in, in other places not. Why was this? Together with a team of community mobilisers from WAT-HST, Rodeo carried out a series of qualitative interviews of “stayers” and “movers”. A working method was developed based on initial findings from interviews, and a series of discoveries were made that helped WAT-HST take action to alleviate the situation. In part, WAT-HST’s problem turned out to be lacking client profiling before offering people loans to construct houses. The problem can be summed up in the following practical equation: income * job situation * family/ size of family * flexibility of work situation = the ability to invest in their home to enable them to move in vs not able to invest in their home.