RODEO ARCHITECTS

Fredrikstad: 10-minute city

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Fredrikstad: 10-minute city

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Type: Comission
Client: Fredrikstad Municipality/Ministry of Local Government and Modernization
Program: Mapping, Analysis, and Strategy
Location: Fredrikstad
Status: Delivered Sept 2014

Team: Anders Ese, Anne Gjesdal Bjørndal, Kenneth Dahlgren
Collaborators: Norstat

Video Presentation: Click here

 

Case Fredrikstad is devised as an urban laboratory for examining the potential and possibilities of the 10-minute city. The project was initiated by Fredrikstad Municipality in light of the Ministry of Local Government and Modernisation’s Plan for large cities (2013-2017).

This part of the project is a compilation of mappings, analyses and recommendations for the city of Fredrikstad in its mission to become a 10-minute city. The project is also a pilot for developing a working methodology for 10-minute city mapping to be implemented in the 12 other Norwegian cities that are under the Plan for large cities umbrella.

Fredrikstad is one of Norway’s largest cities, with a city centre that is geographically defined by the Glomma River estuary. It is a city with a varied housing stock, and an industrial history that is not only visible in the old wharfs along the river, but also in the complexity of the city's social makeup. With projected growth and abundant car use, the Municipality has worked to promote walking and biking within the city core. The project task was to attempt to identify whether or not people were able to access amenities and services within a walk-able or bike-able distance, and whether or not the infrastructure that got them there was sound.

In other words; to what degree is Fredrikstad a 10-minute city? Also, importantly, the project sought to highlight what strategies can possibly be implemented to strengthen the 10-minute city, and how can results of strategies be measured?

Questions like who lives where, what services and amenities are they in need of, how far away are those, and how do they reach them, were key questions that the team worked with.

To answer these questions Rodeo carried out a series of interdisciplinary mapping and analysis exercises. These included:

  • Collecting physical, quantitative data in cooperation with the Municipality
  • Collecting observational data
  • Developing a quantitative survey to go out to households in the mapped areas
  • Execution of survey (by Norstat)
  • Analysis of social data from survey and definition of respondents for qualitative interviews
  • Interviews with respondents
  • Developing an app
  • Synthesis of physical and social data
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Type: Comission
Client: Fredrikstad Municipality/Ministry of Local Government and Modernization
Program: Mapping, Analysis, and Strategy
Location: Fredrikstad
Status: Delivered Sept 2014

Team: Anders Ese, Anne Gjesdal Bjørndal, Kenneth Dahlgren
Collaborators: Norstat

Video Presentation: Click here

 

Case Fredrikstad is devised as an urban laboratory for examining the potential and possibilities of the 10-minute city. The project was initiated by Fredrikstad Municipality in light of the Ministry of Local Government and Modernisation’s Plan for large cities (2013-2017).

This part of the project is a compilation of mappings, analyses and recommendations for the city of Fredrikstad in its mission to become a 10-minute city. The project is also a pilot for developing a working methodology for 10-minute city mapping to be implemented in the 12 other Norwegian cities that are under the Plan for large cities umbrella.

Fredrikstad is one of Norway’s largest cities, with a city centre that is geographically defined by the Glomma River estuary. It is a city with a varied housing stock, and an industrial history that is not only visible in the old wharfs along the river, but also in the complexity of the city's social makeup. With projected growth and abundant car use, the Municipality has worked to promote walking and biking within the city core. The project task was to attempt to identify whether or not people were able to access amenities and services within a walk-able or bike-able distance, and whether or not the infrastructure that got them there was sound.

In other words; to what degree is Fredrikstad a 10-minute city? Also, importantly, the project sought to highlight what strategies can possibly be implemented to strengthen the 10-minute city, and how can results of strategies be measured?

Questions like who lives where, what services and amenities are they in need of, how far away are those, and how do they reach them, were key questions that the team worked with.

To answer these questions Rodeo carried out a series of interdisciplinary mapping and analysis exercises. These included:

  • Collecting physical, quantitative data in cooperation with the Municipality
  • Collecting observational data
  • Developing a quantitative survey to go out to households in the mapped areas
  • Execution of survey (by Norstat)
  • Analysis of social data from survey and definition of respondents for qualitative interviews
  • Interviews with respondents
  • Developing an app
  • Synthesis of physical and social data